TESYouth 5 years Anniversary

This June is TESYouth 5 years Anniversary. We celebrates five years of supporting young people.

Back in 2013 when TESYouth began, 15% of young people aged 16-24 were Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET). Five years later and that rate has now decreased to 11.5% (Office of National Statistics).

Despite this apparently positive trend, young people are still being left behind. According to a new piece of research, around half a million unemployed young people are falling through the gaps, missing out on claiming both benefits and advice, and risking “a life of unemployment and poverty”.

TESYouth is a social enterprise which works to support unemployed and unskilled young people. Since we began five years ago, we have been working with young people in London, running workshops and offering work experience. We have trained young people in enterprise, E-commerce, sales, marketing, IT and business.

Our Communication, Interview Techniques and Employment workshop has helped those we work with to increase their confidence and their future job prospects. We have many more workshops coming up this year; the next one is Sales and Marketingclick here to book a place.

At TESYouth, we understand that young people are the future, but that there can be so many barriers in their way stopping them from achieving what they are capable of. We have spent five years growing and developing as a social enterprise to help support young people grow and develop themselves. And we can’t wait for what the next five years will bring.

Get in touch: whether you’re a young person, a volunteer, a local business or a potential sponsor, we would love to hear from you. Please contact us for more information.

Huge numbers of young people left without state help to survive and find work

Almost half a million young people are at risk of “a life of unemployment and poverty” after being left without any state help to survive and find work, ministers have been warned.

The alarm has been raised over a staggering number of “hidden jobless” who have “fallen off the government radar”, despite promises of intensive support to achieve their potential.

The new research has found that 480,000 16- to 24-year-olds are missing out on both benefits and advice – no less than 60 per cent of the official total of young jobless.

Strikingly, many of them have good job prospects, boasting impressive GCSE qualifications and having continued with their education beyond 16.

But they refuse to go to job centres because they are “unhelpful” or they “fear being treated badly” – due to the threat of sanctions – while others lack the necessary documents.

A senior MP has now demanded answers from ministers, while campaigners are urging the government to let them plug the gap where the state is failing young people. Read more




Young people and housing

A new report by the Resolution Foundation has found, up to a third of young people face living in private rented accommodation all their lives.

The think tank said 40% of “millennials” – those born between 1980 and 1996 – were living in rented housing by the age of 30.

That was twice as many as “generation X” – those born between 1965 and 1980.
The government said it was already putting policies in place to improve the housing market.

The Foundation’s Home Improvements report said “generation rent” needed much more help. It called for more affordable homes for first-time buyers to be built, as well as better protection for those who rent.

Although renting is often a reasonable choice for people who have few ties, the private rented sector is “far less fit for purpose” for those with children because of a lack of security.

The report reveals that a record 1.8 million families with children rent privately, up from 600,000 15 years ago.
It adds that while housing benefit should be able to help millennial families, its value has been reduced relative to the generation who came before them. Read more




Firms relabelling low-skilled jobs as apprenticeships

According to the study by centre-right think tank Reform fast food giants, coffee shops and retailers are relabelling low-skilled jobs as apprenticeships and gaining subsidies for training.

The report says many firms have rebranded existing roles after being obliged to contribute cash to on-the-job training. It adds that 40% of government-approved apprenticeship standards do not meet a traditional definition of them.

The government says “quality” is at the heart of its apprenticeship reforms. As part of the changes, it introduced an apprenticeship levy on organisations paying more than £3m in salaries a year.

They have to pay 0.5% of their wages total into a “digital account” held by HMRC. They then “spend” these contributions on apprenticeship training delivered by registered providers. They can also get back up to 90% of the cost of training.

Low-wage roles
But they are also entitled to pay apprentices lower than the standard minimum wage. The minimum rates range from £3.70 an hour for anyone in their first year of an apprenticeship to £7.38

The report says: “As part of the government’s wider package of reforms to apprenticeships, groups of employers came together to write the new ‘apprenticeship standards’.
“Some used this opportunity to generate high-quality standards, but others appear to be simply rebadging low-quality, low-skill and often low-wage roles as ‘apprenticeships’ instead.”

In 2013, the government said apprenticeships had to be skilled roles, requiring substantial and sustained training of at least 12 months, leading to full competency and should provide the apprentice with transferrable skills in an occupation.

But a quick glance at the government’s official apprenticeships website shows many high street firms advertising for apprentices in what appear to be unskilled roles.

For example, KFC is advertising for an apprentice hospitality team member. The advert describes the apprenticeship as “a structured, learner and employer-focused development programme designed to create opportunities for lifelong knowledge, skills and behaviours”.

But the role is described as cooking “fries” and other products and serving customers front of house, or cooking and assembling KFC products, while maintaining clean, sanitary working conditions.

It says training is based around day-to-day duties, but will also involve one-to-one interactions with a specialised trainer every four to six weeks.

KFC said the apprenticeship existed before the levy was introduced and met all the key standards, and that the firm paid more than the minimum apprenticeship rates. Read more